COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES

 BIOL 0500 – Building Science Skills for the Biological Sciences - 3 Credits
This lecture-laboratory course is designed to prepare the student for college-level biology courses. The building of skills in reading, writing, terminology and experimental techniques in the biological sciences is presented using an active learning process. Study methods, note taking, time management and types of tests for the biological sciences are also included. Lecture: 1.5 hours, Lab: 1.5 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to demonstrate good science study skills:

§         proper note taking

§         proper allocation of study time

§         proper textbook use

§         practice answering various types of test questions.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of living organisms including their chemical composition, cellular structure, and cellular metabolism.

·        Students should be able to apply methods of scientific measurement, analyze experimental data and report experimental results in scientific format.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills.

·         Students should be able to demonstrate facility in using laboratory equipment including the microscope, spectrophotometer and computer assisted graphing.

·         Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the Chemical Hazards Communication Standard and how it applies to a laboratory setting.

 BIOL 0600 – Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology - 1 Credit

This five-week, modular, online course prepares students for success in Human Anatomy – Biol 1010 and Human Physiology – Biol 1020. The focus of this course is development of basic skills required for success in higher education: study skills, time management, basic math and language skills. Students learn the essential science background necessary to be successful in life science course: basic concepts in Biology (biological terminology, cellular structure) and basic concepts in Chemistry (ions, chemical bonding, terminology and chemical notation). Lecture: 3 hours. 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to confidently enroll in a college course with the study tools necessary to actively engage in learning.

·        Students should be able to develop a personal calendar that includes committed study hours outside of the classroom to organize work, family, and school responsibilities

·        Students should be able to locate additional learning materials on-line.

·        Students should be able to develop individual learning strategies for success in college level courses.

·         Students should be able to solve basic arithmetic problems, calculate means, work with exponents, use the metric system, read tables and graphs.

·        Students should be able to understand and use standard medical terminology.

·        Describe the biological hierarchy of organization and differentiate between tissues, organs, and organ systems.

·        Name and describe the basic principals of biology.

·        Understand the basic principals of chemistry: states of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, organic compounds.

·        Describe the organelles of a eukaryotic cell and the function of each; describe movement processes of a cell; describe the cell cycle and cellular reproduction.

 BIOL 1000 – Cell Biology for Technology - 4 Credits
This biology course is designed to introduce basic biological principles while specifically examining life processes at the cellular level. Topics include cell chemistry, the relationship between cell structure and function, metabolism, molecular genetics and cellular communication. Contemporary cell-related technology, as well as its impact and significance is emphasized. Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 3 hours

 STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course: 

·        Students should be able to describe several examples that illustrate the distinguishing characteristics of life at the cellular level.

 ·        Students should be able to explain how the structure of a cell and its organelles allow the cell to exhibit each of the functions that characterize living organisms.                  

·        Students should be able to name several examples of cell types that are used in technological applications of cell biology. 

·        Students should be able to diagram the cyclical flow of energy through living systems. 

·        Students should be able to compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis. 

·        Students should be able to trace the flow of genetic information at the intracellular level, from DNA to protein. 

·        Students should be able to summarize the importance of enzymes and the factors that affect their activity. 

·        Students should be able to perform laboratory documentation according to Good Manufacturing Practices standards. 

·        Students should be able to accurately perform a common technical procedure according to written laboratory instructions (such as a Standard Operating Procedure or laboratory protocol). 

·        Students should be able to apply the Scientific Method in the laboratory and show evidence of ability to troubleshoot when technical problems arise. 

·        Students should be able to perform several contemporary techniques that are common in a typical cell biology lab. 

·        Students should be able to accurately perform laboratory measurements of volume, temperature, and mass that are commonly used in the cell biology lab. 

·         Students should be able to recognize and describe common laboratory safety issues and implement laboratory safety procedures.  

BIOL 1001 – Introductory Biology: Organismal - 4 Credits
This course is one part of a two- semester introduction to the fundamentals of biology intended for science majors. However, Biol 1001 may be taken independently of Biol 1002. The course investigates biology at the organismal level through the presentation and discussion of biological processes and systems, including genetics, evolution and ecology. Additionally, the diversity in form and function of multi-cellular organisms (plants, fungi and animals) is explored. Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the connections between ecology, genetics, evolution, and diversity of multi-cellular organisms.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a conceptual understanding of biological systems and processes that operate at different spatial and temporal scales.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between structure and function in living organisms.

·        Students should be able to accurately record scientific observations and data.

·        Students should be able to use basic mathematics to analyze scientific data.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate competency in the use of laboratory equipment, including computers.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate the proper use of the scientific method through the completion of formal lab reports.

BIOL 1002 – Introductory Biology: Cellular - 4 Credits
This course is one part of a two- semester introduction to the fundamentals of biology intended for science majors. It may be taken independently of Biol 1001. Using the theme of evolution as a framework, the course investigates biology on the cellular level through the presentation of such topics as structure, function, metabolism, genetics, reproduction and differentiation. Additionally, the diversity in form and function of unicellular organisms (bacteria, archae, and protists) is explored. Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Fundamental Learning Objectives/Competencies 

Upon successful completion of the course: 

·        Students should be able to display an ability to communicate, using proper biological vocabulary, in both written and spoken English. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to contribute effectively in cooperative work toward a common goal. 

·        Students should show analytical and problem solving ability in the laboratory through the use of measurement, graphing, and simple statistical analysis.  

·        Students should be able to identify and integrate information from multiple sources through the use of the library and the Internet. 

·        Students should be able to work in the lab and maintain an awareness of laboratory safety and biological/chemical hazards. 

Course-Specific Learning Objectives/Competencies 

Upon successful completion of the course: 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the origin of life on Earth and the evolutionary progression toward more complex forms.  

·        Students should be able to identify the characteristics of living things and described how these are expressed at the cellular and sub-cellular level. 

·        Students should be able to discuss the diversity of life on earth and the role the forces of evolution play in shaping that diversity. 

·        Students should be able to compare and contrast the various kingdoms of life with regard to cellular structure, metabolism, and mechanisms of cellular reproduction, genetics and gene expression. 

·        Students should be able to discuss the societal impacts of recent changes in Life Science and related technologies. 

BIOL 1005 – Biology in the Modern World - 4 Credits
This course investigates the basic biological principles needed to understand and make informed decisions regarding vital biological issues in today’s world; for example, global warming, obesity, biodiversity, cancer, race, genetic engineering, and human population growth. Note: This course is designed for non-science majors; not open to science majors; not open to science majors. This class fulfills four credits of Math/Science General Education requirements. Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course: 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of basic biological processes and concepts. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate clear and correct expression in both written and spoken English. 

·        Students should be able to access information from a variety of sources. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate problem solving and analytical skills. 

·        Students should be able to analyze planetary issues and their effect on life and work. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to function as a member or leader of a team. 

·        Students should be able to perform appropriate professional skills. 

·        Students should exhibit satisfaction in their quality of performance. 

BIOL 1010 – Human Anatomy - 4 Credits
The study of the human organism with respect to the gross and microscopic anatomy of the organ systems. Laboratory work includes dissection of the cat and appropriate isolated organs. (Although not a prerequisite, it is recommended that students take BIOL 1002 - Introductory Biology: Cellular, before taking BIOL 1010.) Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to uunderstand and use common anatomical terminology. 

·        Students should be able to identify human anatomical structures using illustrations, relative position in the body, descriptions of morphology, and the dissected cat. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the relationship between anatomical structure and function at the tissue, organ, and system level. 

·        Students should be able to use a variety of learning techniques and demonstrate good study skills.  

·        Students should be able to follow written dissection instructions, develop skill in gross dissection, and work as part of a team in the laboratory. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate critical thinking, with some applications to clinical situations, disease processes, and news reports. 

BIOL 1020 – Human Physiology - 4 Credits
This course presents a study of the human organism, including basic chemical composition and function of the cell. The course stresses homeostatic control systems and coordinated body functions. (Prerequisite: BIOL 1010) Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of cellular structure and function.

·        Students should be able to explain the basic biochemical processes occurring at the cellular level.

·        Students should be able to apply basic chemical and physical principles to physiological processes in the organism.

·        Students should be able to explain the fundamental relationship between structure and function.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of homeostasis.

·        Students should be able to describe the mechanism by which homeostasis is maintained.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the organ systems and the mechanisms by which they function.

·        Students should be able to describe the interaction of the organ systems in the maintenance of homeostasis.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of physiological terminology.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to apply physiological concepts.

·        Students should be able to use discipline-specific laboratory equipment to acquire physiological data.

·        Students should be able to interpret and manipulate experimental data.

BIOL 1050 — Man and the Environment - 3 Credits
A study of man’s relation to the ecosystem. Environmental issues such as energy supplies, energy alternatives, forms of pollution, food production, population growth and resources management will be considered. Lecture: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Student should be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the Limits to Growth of all components of the Ecosystem.  They should be able to use Exponential and Logistic Growth Curves to explain and amplify a discussion of this topic.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the Scientific Method, and be able to explain what scientific investigation actually encompasses.

·        Students should be able to identify the components of an ecosystem and demonstrate an understanding of the nature of energy degradation.

·        Students should be able to discuss ecosystem succession, species interactions and sustainability of the environment.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of Biodiversity as it applies to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the various forms of pollution, the particular characteristics of each type, and the effects of each upon our environment.

·        Students should be able to discuss specific environmental laws of the land.

·        Students should be able to explain various alternative energy resources and identify the significant strengths and weaknesses of each.

·        Students should be able to construct components of a feasible energy policy appropriate to the State and Federal levels.

·        Students should be able to discuss the differences between Hard energy and Soft energy resources, as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

·        Students should be able to organize significant arguments pertaining to environmental issues and be able to defend their point of view verbally and in writing.

BIOL 1070 – Human Anatomy and Physiology - 3 Credits
Credits Covers the basic principles of anatomy and physiology of the human body with consideration of the relationship of these body systems with their environment. Demonstrations and audio-visual presentations are included. Lecture: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:  

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a familiarity with basic anatomical terminology. 

·        Students should be able to explain the relationship between structure and function. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of homeostasis. 

·        Students should be able to identify the systems of the body and locate and describe the structure of their major organs. 

·         Students should be able to explain some mechanisms used by each system of the body to maintain homeostasis and some inter-relationships between the systems.

BIOL 1080 – Introduction to Clinical Procedures - 3 Credits
Lectures provide an understanding of the theoretical basis and physiological implications of clinical procedures in the medical office and prepare the student for further professional training. Laboratory experiences in vital signs, asepsis, sterilization, blood studies and urine studies supplement the lecture material. (Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Medical Secretary/Assistant Program and BIOL 1070) Lecture: 2 hours, Lab: 2 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to take the vital signs of temperature, pulse, blood pressure and respiratory rate.  Students should also be able to demonstrate knowledge of the normal values and the physiology associated with the vital signs.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in preparing the patient examining room, taking patient history and assisting the physician during the physical examination of the patient.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the OSHA Exposure Control Plan to eliminate or minimize employee exposure to blood borne pathogens and other potentially infectious material.

·        Students must demonstrate a basic knowledge about the bacterial and viral infections that might be seen in the medical office.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the diagnostic tests in microbiology, hematology and urinalysis. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of pulmonary, cardiovascular and auditory testing.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of a balanced diet and the nutrients essential for the balanced diet. 

BIOL 1110 – Introduction to Pharmacology - 1 Credit
Introduction to basic pharmacology, terminology and mechanism of drug action. Use, adverse response, special cautions and interactions of drugs commonly used in dental and medical practices are emphasized. (Prerequisite: Enrollment in Dental Assistant Program, Medical Transcription or Medical Secretary/Assistant Program and BIOL 1070) Lecture: 1 hour

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course: 

·        Students should be able to use basic pharmacological terminology. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the general mechanisms of drug action.  

·         Students should be able to list the various drug forms. 

·         Students should be able to identify the routes of drug administration and drug pathways through the body. 

·         Students should be able to identify some specific classes of drugs, their physiologic action, therapeutic and toxic effects, and their interactions and incompatibilities with other drugs.  

BIOL 1200 – The Human in Health and Disease - 3 Credits
A course designed to teach people more about themselves. Topics include cancers, birth defects, birth control, organ transplants, cloning, infectious diseases, heart disease and diets. Lecture: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of chronic and communicable diseases and practices involved in disease prevention.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the effects of drugs of abuse on the human body.

·        Students should be able to discuss a balanced diet and the value of exercise to health.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of genetic counseling.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of birth control methods, and the stages of pregnancy.

·        Students must demonstrate the ability to find, use and evaluate scientific articles on health-related topics.

BIOL-1300 –Orientation to Biotechnology - 1 Credit

This course provides and overview of the history and fundamental principles necessary to understand the role of biotechnology in our society. Specific topics are selected to provide examples of applications, ethical considerations and career paths in the field of biotechnology. Students are also introduced to the pathway leading from research and development, to production of a biopharmaceutical product, including the regulatory considerations involved. Lecture: 1 hour

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

 Upon successful completion of the course: 

·        Students should be able to define “biotechnology”.

·        Students should be able to explain the origins of biotechnology as a human endeavor and contrast this with the field of modern biotechnology.

·        Students should be able to describe several examples of events that were significant to the development of the field of modern biotechnology.

·        Students should be able to describe several examples of the applications of biotechnology.

·        Students should be able to trace the flow of genetic information from the level of genes to proteins.

·         Students should be able to describe several examples of tools that are used in the manipulation of DNA and expression of genes in host cells.

·        Students should be able to list several examples of ethical issues that are related to biotechnology.

·        Students should be able to both orally and in writing, clearly summarize and support both sides of an argument relating to an ethical issue related to biotechnology.

·        Students should be able to describe sequentially, the major steps involved in getting a biopharmaceutical product from research and development to market. describe several examples of the applications of biotechnology.

·        Students should be able to locate and navigate the Federal Drug Administration’s websites and the guidelines that are relevant to the production of biopharmaceutical products.

·        Students should be able to explain the role of Good Manufacturing Practices in the production of biopharmaceutical products.

·         Students should be able to describe the general role of each of the major departments found within a typical biopharmaceutical production plant.  Relate these roles to GMP and FDA regulations.

·         Students should be able to navigate the internet to find accurate information regarding biotechnology applications, issues, and jobs. 

BIOL-1310 – Introductory Biotechnology Skills - 3 Credits

This course provides an opportunity for students to learn laboratory skills that are fundamental to successful efficient and safe practices in a biotechnology research, quality control or production laboratory setting. Students are introduced to methods of measurement, data collection and analysis, solution and media preparation, safe laboratory practices and the practical application of mathematics to these processes. In addition, students are introduced to Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) and, Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and related topics that emphasize the significance of maintaining quality in a biological research or production setting. Lecture: 1 hour, Laboratory: 3 hours.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to prepare buffers.

·        Students should be able to prepare sterile media

·        Students should be able to perform calculations necessary for the preparation of media and solutions.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in use of the metric system of measurement.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding and use of significant figures.

·         Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to maintain a safe laboratory working environment.

·        Students should be able to use volume and mass measuring devices.

·        Students should be able to be able to explain the significance of “quality” in various laboratory settings.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of GMP documentation

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of GLP documentation.

·         Students should be able to use a pH meter to measure the pH of a solution and to adjust the pH of a buffer.

·         Students should be able to use a visible light spectrophotometer

·         Students should be able to perform serial dilution and demonstrate an understanding of the use of serial dilution.

·        Students should be able to use a centrifuge in a safe and proper manner.

·        Students should be able to use an autoclave in a safe and proper manner.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate proper gowning technique

·        Students should be able to graph a set of data using Excel software

·         Students should be able to prepare and use a standard curve to analyze experimental data.

·        Students should be able to write an SOP for a standard unit of laboratory equipment.

·        Students should be able to use an SOP to perform a task.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate laboratory management skills (e.g. planning and purchasing; familiarity with use of company web sites)

BIOL 2040 – Human Sexuality - 3 Credits
An exploration of the physiological, psychological and cultural aspects of human sexuality. Topics include reproductive health, forms and evolution of sexual expression, psychosexual development and the role of sex in the individual’s life as well as in society. Lecture: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the Scientific Method, and be able to explain what scientific investigation actually encompasses.

·        Students should be able to identify significant historical figures involved in research into Human Sexuality, and what it is that they achieved.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the historical events that influenced our perceptions of what sexuality is.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the anatomy of the male and female reproductive systems.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the function or physiology of the male and female reproductive systems.

·        Students should be able to explain the genetic basis of gender and be able to identify the processes by which gametes can be produced.

·        Students should be able to identify the specific aspects of sexual development in three stages of human development, namely childhood, adolescence adulthood.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the nature of the sexual response and the various models that explain the physiology.

·        Students should be able to explain the types and origins of various atypical sexual behaviors.

·        Students should be able to discuss the causes of sexual dysfunctions and the associated therapies.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the techniques used to enhance sexual communication.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the various types of fertility control approaches as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the effects of coercive sexual relationships.

·        Students should be able to identify various Sexually Transmitted Diseases or STD’s.

BIOL 2090 – Genetics - 3 Credits
This lecture course introduces the basic concepts of inheritance, variation and evolution in plants and animals and includes a survey of Mendelian, molecular, cellular and population genetics. (Prerequisite: One year of biology) Lecture: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to appropriately use terminology specific to the science of genetics.

 ·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of classical/Mendelian genetics.

 ·        Students should be able to apply Mendelian principles and gain an appreciation of genetic counseling and pedigree development. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the chromosomal and molecular basis of inheritance and gene expression. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of bacterial genetics. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of mutagenesis/mutations and the consequences of genetic change. 

·        Students should be able to explain Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium, the assumptions under which equilibrium exists, and the forces that affect gene frequencies in populations. 

·        Students should be able to solve problems using the H-W equation to calculate allele or genotype frequency. 

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the mechanisms by which the forces of evolution affect gene frequencies in populations. 

·        Students should be able to discuss the significance of genetic manipulation and its application in biotechnology.

BIOL-2100 and 2110 – Biology Seminar - 1 Credit
Preparation and presentation of papers dealing with selected topics in biology. (Prerequisite: One year of biology or permission of instructor) Lecture: 1 hour

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Outcomes dependent upon topic

BIOL 2210 – Introductory Microbiology - 4 Credits
A descriptive approach to the anatomy, growth, reproduction and genetics of selected microorganisms. Topics include pathogenic mechanisms, immunology, microbial control and applied microbiology. (Prerequisites: BIOL 1010 and 1020) Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the morphological and metabolic diversity of microorganisms and how that diversity is reflected in microbial ecology and pathogenesis of specific human pathogens.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of microbial genetics and its application to genetic engineering.

·        Students should be able to discuss the characteristics of microbial growth and the use of physical and chemical controls in limiting growth and resolving infections.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the nonspecific and specific mechanisms of the human immune response and how these mechanisms work together to eliminate infecting microorganisms.

·        Students should be able to explain the role microbes play as normal flora, as part of ecosystems and in the manufacture of medically and industrially useful substances.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate the mastery of aseptic technique, and the ability to apply staining and biochemical methods in the classification and identification of microbial unknowns.

·        Students should be able to use the terminology of microbiology and infectious diseases.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the Chemical Hazards Communication and Bloodborne Pathogen Standard and how they apply in laboratory and clinical settings.

BIOL 2220 – Introduction to Pathophysiology - 3 Credits

The course begins by examining the disease process in general, from the etiology of disease at the cellular level to the physiologic changes that occur as the disease moves from incipient stage to full expression. The second half of the course examines the pathogenesis of specific diseases system by system. Lecture: 3 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to use terminology of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology.

·        Students should be able to discuss the pathophysiologic changes that occur as a result of cell injury.

·        Students should be able to discuss genes and distinguish between genetic disorders and congenital disorders with examples.

·        Students should be able to discuss neoplasia from oncogenesis to tumor structure and behavior, and explain common effects.

·        Students should be able to discuss the events of inflammation and analyze its role in both homeostasis and disease.

·        Students should be able to explain the known etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of some of the major diseases system by system.

·        Students should be able to apply anatomy (morphology) and physiology (function) concepts to identify selected disease conditions.

·        Students should be able to utilize many learning techniques and study skills.

BIOL 2480 – General Microbiology - 4 Credits
A look at microbes, particularly bacteria, from a biochemical and molecular perspective. Emphasis is placed on microbial physiology and genetics with applications to biotechnology. (Prerequisites: One year of chemistry and one semester of biology.) Lecture: 2 hours, Lab: 4 hours

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course:

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the morphological diversity among both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the cell biology of microorganisms including their metabolic pathways and genetics.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of microbial growth, and the use of physical and chemical methods used to control growth and resolve infections.

·        Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the human immune response.

·         Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the roles microorganisms play in geochemical cycles, as normal flora on plants and animals, and as instruments in genetic engineering and industrial production.

·         Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the routes of transmission and epidemiology of infectious microorganisms using specific examples of human pathogens.

·         Students should be able to demonstrate mastery of aseptic technique, and the ability to apply staining and biochemical methods in the classification and identification to microbial unknowns.

·         Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to apply course concepts and learned laboratory techniques in solving environmental and industrial case studies.

·         Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the Chemical Hazards Communication and Bloodborne Pathogen Standards* and how they apply in laboratory, industrial and clinical settings.

*OSHA’s Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals (29CFR 1910.1450)

 OSHA’S Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens (29CFR 1910.1030)

                           

 

 

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Last updated: November 06, 2008

 

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